Wonderful Red Wines for those Cold Winter NIghts

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This week, my friend, world class musician, and wine connoisseur Denny Jiosa is doing another wine tutorial for us. Denny has some great and affordable red wine recommendations for the cold nights that most of us are facing this winter.

This wine, with this pasta? Magnifico!

Last time my husband and I dropped by the wine store, Denny recommended we try the first wine he mentions in today’s Wine Notes: “Le Cantine di Indie Vino del Popolo”. Sure, it’s a mouthful to say (it’s an Italian wine), but even more importantly, it’s a mouthful to sip as well! We loved it so much we have since purchased several bottles to keep on hand to serve with a great plate of pasta. And can I just tell you how well it goes with anything that contains BACON? Like a Pasta Carbonara, or my most favorite pasta in the whole wide world, Perciatelli all’Amatriciana. (Or, as I call it, because I’m not sure exactly how to pronounce it: Best Pasta Ever.) You might also want to pair it with an antipasto plate, and I’ve included a link to a recipe for one that is an absolute a show-stopper: Mixed Antipasto.

So, without further ado, let’s get on to:

Jammin Jiosa’s Wine Notes

with Denny Jiosa
Welcome to 2013! The weather is cold and hopefully you have a cozy warm fireplace burning, someone to snuggle with, and a great glass of wine! 
This time of year calls for some of my favorite grape varietals including, Cabernet Sauvignon, Shiraz, Nebbiolo, Valpolicella, and Primitivo!
It’s the wine of the people, people!
Let me tell you about a new Italian wine I am quite fond of,  Le Cantine di Indie Vino Rosso del Popolo  (wine of the people). It’s a blend of 50% Nebbiolo, 30% Barbera, and 20% Dolcetto. This is a dry wine with characters of bright red fruits, low tannins, and obvious elements of Italian terroir. Perfecto with red sauce, cheeses, or an antipasto plate! These grapes are from the Piedmont region of Italy. Nebbiolo is king in that area and is what Barolo and Barberesco are made from. An outstanding wine at around $15.00. 
The aforementioned antipasto. It really is to die for.
On the Shiraz side I really enjoyed Small Gully Mr. Black’s Little Book Shiraz 2008 from Barossa Valley, Australia. This to me is a wonderful comfort wine in that it reflects jammy blackberry, raspberry, chocolate and vanilla with a long,warm finish! This would be outrageous with your favorite grilled burger! Just a delight on the palate! $15.00
Next up, Cannonball, a California Cabernet with fruit from Napa, Mendocino, and Dry Creek. This wine’s taste is loaded with dark cherry, strawberry, and dark chocolate. What I really noticed (and enjoyed) was the hint of cedar on the palate. I would assume the vines of some of the fruit were grown near cedar trees. Vines pick up characteristics of the terroir (the dirt) they are grown in and pass on elements to the grapes. Delicious with lamb chops! Check it out…$15.00
My birthday was a few days ago and I was given the chance to taste an exquisite wine, a 2008 Shafer Hillside Select Cabernet Sauvignon.This is what most Cabernet’s aspire to be. Full bodied on the palette, blackberry, black cherry, dark chocolate, smoke and a touch of vanilla. This was a special treat (gift) and at $250.00 a bottle, not one I will experience often. Thank you Dave, at Red Spirits and Wine in Bellevue, TN.!
Start that fireplace, grab that someone special, turn on the jazz, and pop the cork! Remember, you need great music to complete your wine experience, so please visit http://jiosa.com/albums/  and get your copies today! 

P.S from Susan:
If you have any wine questions for Denny, we’d love to hear them in the comments! We’re hoping to provide information that is informative and helpful


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